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Meteorologist George Flickinger's Storm Chasing Pictures and Southern Plains Forecasts
Flickinger Weather
Flickinger Weather
Meteorologist George Flickinger's Storm Chasing Pictures and Southern Plains Forecasts
Flickinger Weather
Our crew witnessed several tornadoes this day including the classic example of tornado formation. Presenting Harper County in Southern Kansas from May 29, 2004:
Looking from the West, this developing storm shows a new circulation between the arrows. We've  been following this cloud since birth for an hour, and the jagged lowering is organizing.
We continue eastward as the storm travels north of us. Looking from south to north, a funnel emerges from the wall cloud. The cows don't seemed to concerned.
Picture #7 shows this beautiful tornado about 3 miles north. It's a perfect setup as it's in rural Kansas. The tornado is tracking away from us, so we jump back in the car to go get it!
After a 5 minute drive, we're west of the tornado. The circulation begins a slow death as it detachs itself from the parent circulation in the cloud.
The sun reappears, illuminating the wheat. The tornado is slowly weakening but will live on for another 10 minutes!
uh oh, a house is in the way. ..The tornado is 2 miles east of us, and in the process of swallowing a home.
Rescue crews beat us to the house. Looking down the dirt road we spot the damaged farm house. Power lines are draped across the road in front of us.
Dave Williams and I provided info and pics to the Wichita NWS to assist with the tornado survey. Originally rated "F0", the rating was changed to an F1 tornado which travelled about 5 miles from SW to NE during a near 30 minute life cycle.
These pics are taken about 1 minutes apart. Though it took a while for the visible condensation funnel to reach the ground, the tornado had a longish lifespan-- we watched for over 20 minutes!